Ethereum (ETH)

Make better choices with Ethereum.

Before investing in Ethereum, it's important to understand it. That's why we've made this plain-talking guide and created a list of where to go in order to help you buy Ethereum responsibly.

Low: $0 (99.30 )
Current: $ 6,554.80
High: $20,000(-66.30 )
  • Current Ethereum Price:$ 94.89
  • Today:-$ 0.55
  • Past 12 Month:-88.92%
  • Market cap:$ 9,855.32 M
  • Volume 24:$ 110,367,658.1
  • Supply:Ξ 103,860,488.8

What is Ethereum?


This guide lays out the basics: what ether is and the multiple ways it can be used. If you already know your stuff on Ethereum, then scroll down to find the best places to buy and use ether, along with the latest news and updates.

1a - What is a blockchain?

This is the first thing anyone needs to know in order to understand what Ethereum is. The blockchain is the technology that makes cryptocurrency possible.

In layman’s terms, a blockchain is a publicly accessible accounting book (ledger) that records all transactions made with a single currency. Blockchain technology can actually record transactions of any form of digital information, but its most important use to date has been enabling the movement of cryptocurrency between different people.

A good way to understand how a blockchain functions is to compare it to a regular accounting book. A traditional accounting book is usually maintained and updated by a singular person or entity such as a bank. It’s the bank that acts as a central authority by keeping track of how much money people have in their accounts and any transfers they make or receive. In this way a regular accounting book is ‘centralised’, with the bank acting as the middleman for all transactions.

A blockchain, on the other hand, is ‘decentralised’. This means that transactions are recorded on its ledger without a central authority verifying them. It might sound a little complicated, but the following analogy should help you get to grips with how it works:

Think of a 5-a-side football game that you’re playing with your friends, where there isn’t a referee (central authority) present. As players, you can keep track of the score as the game goes on, and the game only continues if everyone agrees on the score shown on the scoreboard (ledger). If one person from the ten thinks that the score is different, for instance they insist that their team is winning 3-1 when the others know the score is actually 2-1, the majority’s opinion takes priority. The same democratic process takes place with each new goal scored, and the score is then adjusted to reflect which team scored the goal.

The blockchain is the football game, the score is the transaction history, and agreeing whether a goal has been scored and who scored it is the verification of a transaction. All taking place without a central authority (referee) updating the ledger (scoreboard).

Now you’ve got the basic premise, let’s look at how an actual blockchain works. Don’t worry if everything hasn't clicked into place yet, going through the following sections will help you build a better picture of what Ethereum is.

1b - What is a block within the blockchain?

Blocks are groups of transactions stored on a blockchain.

Imagine keeping a record of your personal finances in a new, empty accounting book. As soon as you start to record your transactions in the book, the pages within it start to get filled, and new pages will continually be added as the old ones are full. If you picked out a transaction from any individual page and changed it, the accounting book becomes useless after that point, as the balance shown on the following pages would be incorrect.

A ‘block’ within a blockchain is just like an individual page of an accounting book: it is a record of different transactions. When new transactions on the blockchain are verified, they are grouped together in a single block. New blocks are then added on top of those that have been created before, updating the ledger and creating a chain of connected blocks: a blockchain.

In the same way that you cannot change one of the transactions on a previous page in your personal accounts book without invalidating all the subsequent pages, you cannot alter a block once it has been added to the blockchain.

1c - Why should you care?

In a sentence, blockchain technology is important because it removes middlemen. You no longer need a centralised authority (such as a bank) to have control over regular transactions, giving power back to regular people.

At present, if you were to go to your local high street shop to buy a pair of shoes with your debit card, the transaction would look a little like this:

You > Your bank > The shop’s bank > The shop.

This is because banks control your money for you. They have to verify that you have enough funds to complete a payment before they can transfer your funds to someone else; that ‘someone else’ will be the shop owner’s bank, which will then add the money to his/her account for them. Sounds like an over complicated way to buy shoes, no?

Blockchain technology removes the need for an intermediary such as a bank to oversee and record transactions. Here’s how a blockchain transaction works:

You > The shop.

During this process, no centralised banks are needed as this verification process is carried out by the users of the blockchain themselves - just like how the score was maintained in the football game in section 1a. Once this transaction has occurred, it will be added to a block, which will later be added to the blockchain.

1d - What problem did blockchain technology solve?

Blockchain technology provides a solution to what is commonly known as the ‘double-spending problem’. Put simply, a blockchain stops people from being able to spend the same money twice, while removing the need for a central authority to oversee and verify transactions.

Take the example of cash. The double spending problem doesn’t exist when spending cash because the exchange is physical: if you give a £10 pound note to someone, you no longer have that note and cannot therefore give it to another person. However, if you spend £10 pounds digitally, it is more complicated to verify that you no longer have it in your possession and stop you spending it again.

With digital currencies, a system needs to be in place to stop people spending the same money more than once. Banks have patched over this problem through centralised control: taking charge of verifying every transaction that takes place between people’s accounts. By controlling everyone’s transactions, the bank decides how much money each person has in their account and ensures that nobody can transfer the same £10 to two different people.

But there’s a catch. This also means that banks have complete control over your money. If a bank is compromised by a malicious third party, or decides to act in a fraudulent manner, its account holders could lose their money because ultimately their accounts are owned and controlled by the bank.

Blockchain technology solves the double spending problem without the need for a bank. Each transaction on a blockchain is verified by its users, and then added to the public ledger of the blockchain (as explained in section 1b). Once you transfer £10 to someone else, the transfer is recorded on the blockchain, proving that you no longer have that £10 and cannot spend it again.

The crucial part of this is the decentralisation of the process: you no longer have to place your trust in a central body to handle financial transactions. When banks are controlling everyone’s money, all the data is hidden away to be seen and managed by a select group of people. These people have a great deal of power, if they are corrupt or incompetent, then everyone with money in the bank is at risk. The blockchain is public and transparent, granting equal power to all of its users and taking it away from shady financial institutions.

Solving the double spending problem with blockchain technology is what made cryptocurrency a viable alternative to ‘regular’ currencies.

1e - So, what is a cryptocurrency?

A cryptocurrency is a digital currency that uses a blockchain technology to record transactions.

When you need to make a payment to someone, instead of transacting with regular fiat currency (e.g. pounds, euros, and dollars), you will need to use the cryptocurrency supported on that blockchain. For example, ether is the currency that sits on top of the Ethereum blockchain. You cannot have a cryptocurrency without a blockchain.

The ‘crypto’ in cryptocurrency refers to cryptography. Cryptography is the process of encrypting information so that it cannot be read by anyone other than who it is intended for. Children passing coded notes in class that the teacher can’t understand is a basic form of cryptography, the Enigma code used by Germany in World War 2 is a much more advanced example.

When something has been encrypted, third parties can see it’s there but can’t understand it. This is how cryptocurrency moves on the blockchain. When coins are transferred between people, the blockchain publicly displays how much cryptocurrency was moved, but not the identities of the people involved in the transaction.

To understand this new form of digital currency further, it’s time to move on and look at the second largest cryptocurrency of them all: ether.

2a - What is ether?

Ether is the cryptocurrency supported by the Ethereum blockchain. The term ‘Ethereum’ is commonly misused to refer to both the cryptocurrency and the blockchain. This is not the case: ‘ether’ is the digital currency that is used and transacted on the ‘Ethereum’ blockchain. The Ethereum blockchain publicly records the history of ether transactions.

In order to understand Ethereum, it is important to know why it was created and where it came from. Continue reading and we'll take you through all the details you need to know, before moving on to explaining how Ethereum works and how you can use ether today.

2b - Who or what created Ethereum?

Ethereum was devised and created by Vitalik Buterin.

The idea behind Ethereum was first put forward in 2013, when Vitalik was just a 19 year-old blockchain enthusiast. In his article, Vitalik proposed the creation of a blockchain network platform that would allow for decentralised applications (known as dApps) to be built on top of it, almost like how mobile apps can be built for the App Store or Google Play Store.

Development on the Ethereum blockchain started after the article gained traction amongst the early cryptocurrency community, and the first publicly available version of the platform was launched on the 31st of July of 2015, the day the first block was created.

2c - Why was it created?

Vitalik envisioned that the potential for blockchain technology could be extended beyond simply allowing users to transact peer-to-peer with each other without a central authority. Ethereum was created because Vitalik wanted a blockchain network that allowed its users to create their own decentralised applications on it.

The purpose of Ethereum was to go beyond simply being a cryptocurrency, and also provide a network which allowed users to make blockchain technology a part of everyday life. Unlike cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, which use a blockchain simply to record the movements of currency, the Ethereum blockchain allows for people to set up automatically executing ‘smart contracts’.

These will be explained in further detail in section 3c, when we look in closer detail at how Ethereum works.

2d - Who owns the Ethereum blockchain?

Although Vitalik created the Ethereum blockchain, he does not own it. No one owns the Ethereum blockchain. The nature of a blockchain is to be decentralised, which means that no one person, group, or entity controls it.

On a technical level, the Ethereum blockchain is a form of open-source software, meaning that it is controlled by its users, who vote on any proposed changes to the code through direct democracy (like the football game with no referee in section 1a). People can freely look at the source code of the blockchain and suggest edits to it, but updates require an ‘economic majority’ to be successfully incorporated.

Just like any app on your phone, updates are made to the blockchain to help it work more efficiently, increase security, or any other improvements it may need. However, when updating an app, it’s the company that owns it that will decide and enact the updates; with Ethereum, only updates that the majority of users agree to are implemented.

This democratic approach to the management of Ethereum is a core component of how the Ethereum network works.

3a - How is ether transferred?

Imagine sending someone (e.g. your friend Gemma) an email that reads ‘1 ether’. You would:

  1. Log into your email account
  2. Enter Gemma’s email address
  3. Type ‘1 ether’ into the body of the email
  4. Hit send
  5. Gemma would receive a message reading ‘1 ether’

An ether transfer works in a similar way, but instead of email accounts you and Gemma each have ‘wallets’. If you were sending 1 ether to Gemma, she would receive 1 ether in her wallet, rather than an email in her inbox.

From a user’s perspective, wallets function like email accounts, but they are much more secure. Each wallet has a public address used to send and receive ether (like your email address), and a ‘private key’ used to access your funds (like your password).

An ether wallet public address (also known as a ‘public key’ or ‘wallet address’) is comprised of a string of 42 letters (A-F) and numbers (0-9), which always start with the characters ‘0x’. Public addresses are case-sensitive. Here’s an example of an ether wallet address:

0x56D59Ea9AC42Ecb7Af006116AB586E485d7759F9

Users of the blockchain can transfer funds to your wallet by entering your public address, and if you transfer ether to somewhere else it will be recorded on the blockchain as having been sent from your wallet address.

Private keys are comparable to your password. They are what enable you to access the ether you have received, and send ether to other wallets. But private keys are much, much more secure than email passwords. Private keys take the form of a 64 character long string of letters (a-f) and numbers (0-9). Here’s an example of one:

2bed716962b080c320fdb000947ebc73d5fff67a25820eeebef432cac9326d27

So, if you wanted to make a payment to Gemma, you would first need to have your wallet’s private key to gain access to your ether wallet and the funds held within it. You can then choose to send funds from your wallet to Gemma’s through entering her wallet’s public address.

The transaction will then be publicly recorded on the blockchain as a transfer of one ether from your wallet to Gemma’s.

3b - Can you have less than one ether?

Yes you can. Ether is divisible, and can be broken up into fractions of up to 19 decimal places. The smallest fraction of an ether that you can store on a wallet, or to transfer to others is 0.000000000000000001 ETH (well under a hundred billionth of an ether). This is known as a ‘gwei’.

The divisibility of ether works just the same as regular currency. In the UK, the currency is pounds, but you can get 50p, 20p, 10p, 5p, 2p, and 1p pieces.

3c - What are ‘smart contracts’?

On a fundamental level, ‘smart contracts are virtual ‘if-then’ contracts: a set of code that automatically executes an action when certain conditions are met. Think of a vending machine; a vending machine is programmed to give you a bag of sweets that costs £1 automatically once you have inserted £1 and selected the bag of sweets. This is what is meant by an ‘if-then’ contract: if you pay the right amount and select what you want, then the machine will give it to you. If you don’t, it won’t.

Smart contracts are what we referred to in section 2b as the ‘decentralised applications’ supported by the Ethereum blockchain. The possibilities for what can be created are virtually endless, as the functionality of a smart contract is only limited by the complexity of the code it was written with. Anything can be coded as a smart contract, from the creation of a democratic voting network for shareholders of a company, to decentralised gambling and casino games, to simple exchanges of goods and services.

Let’s consider an exchange that’s a little more complicated than a vending machine. In the physical world, if I wanted to sell my used PS4 to Bob for £180, I would tell Bob ‘If you give me £180, then my PS4 is yours’. If Bob followed up on my offer, and gave me £180, I would be personally responsible for handing my physical PS4 over.

Two scenarios are now possible: one where I hand over the PS4 and the deal is complete, and another where I refuse, and Bob chases me up for his money and possibly seeks legal action. The only way to avoid the latter situation is to employ a middleman who would hold the PS4 on escrow for Bob if he pays the £180 on time, or returns it back to me if he does not. However, just like how the banks can act fraudulently with your funds, the middleman can’t necessarily be fully trusted with Bob’s funds here, even if Bob makes the payment on time.

Smart contracts on the Ethereum blockchain get rid of the need for middlemen. Here is a simplified version of how a smart contract might work: a contract can be created where John will agree to put £180 worth of ether into escrow. The contract will operate on the basis that If I give the PS4 by a specifically agreed time, then the ether in escrow will go to me, and if I don’t, then the ether in escrow is refunded to John. All of this happens instantaneously.

Ultimately, smart contracts ensure that no two parties can be in the possession of both sides of the transaction (in this case, the PS4 and the £180) at the same time. The transaction happens instantly and without the need to place trust in a third party.

The Ethereum blockchain removes the possibility for smart contracts to be fraudulently manipulated. Just like how it records the history of ether transactions, the blockchain records the ‘state’ of all smart contracts, and makes the information publicly available. In other words, the blockchain records whether smart contracts have been executed or are yet to execute, so that there can be no disagreements about what has happened.

To give one further example of how smart contracts can be useful, have you ever seen a Kickstarter campaign that promised a great idea, but you never felt like you could invest into it because you had no idea who was behind the project and whether they would actually carry it out? A smart contract could address this issue. For instance, a contract could operate by keeping all donated funds in escrow, and the money can only be used on the condition that a certain goal of a project is reached by a specific deadline. If the goal is reached, then the funds held in escrow can go towards the project, and if it doesn’t, everyone automatically gets their money back immediately.

Smart contracts usually transact using ether, but it’s possible you may have heard before that different cryptocurrencies also exist on the Ethereum blockchain (don’t worry if this is news to you). These are known as ERC-20 tokens.

3d - What are ERC20 tokens?

Cryptocurrencies that exist on the Ethereum blockchain that adhere to ERC-20 standards are known as ‘ERC-20 tokens’. ERC-20 stands for Ethereum Request for Comment-20, although the 20 has no significant meaning. The standard was created to provide users with an easier way of storing, using, and transferring cryptocurrencies created on the Ethereum blockchain.

ERC-20 tokens are their own cryptocurrencies, separate from ether, and they are often used to fulfill a particular purpose. For example, one ERC-20 token might be used specifically as points in a loyalty program, and another might function as a discounting platform (like Groupon). Think of these tokens as cryptocurrencies with a specific purpose; whereas you might use bitcoin or ether to pay for a wide variety of things, you’re more likely to find an ERC-20 token specifically designed for betting on eSports or transacting with lower fees on a specific platform.

Almost anything can be created as an ERC-20 token, by anyone, which is why more than 10,000 exist at present.

3e - What is ether mining?

Mining is the process that verifies the legitimacy of ether transactions and adds them to the Ethereum blockchain in the form of new blocks.

Remember the football players from the game in section 1c, who kept score of the game without the need for a referee? They are the miners: the users of the blockchain who verify transactions without a central authority calling the shots.

When it comes to ether, mining involves computers competing to solve mathematical equations in a process known as ‘hashing’.

To imagine how mining works, it is best to envision a situation where multiple people are working on solving 5 by 5 rubik’s cube, where the first person to complete the cube is rewarded with £100.

With mining, instead of solving a rubik’s cube, miners are working on verifying ether transactions, grouping them into blocks, and adding them to the blockchain. Once this process is complete, instead of £100, the successful miner is awarded with a set amount of ether as a ‘block reward’. This reward is what encourages more people to participate in ether mining, which is what keeps the blockchain decentralised.

The mathematics behind mining are complicated, and it is not necessary to understand them fully in order to use and spend ether - just as you don’t have to be able to build a computer in order to use one, or understand investment banking to have a debit account.

If you’re interested in learning how to mine ether, you can do so on our designated ‘Mining’ pages. For now we’re going to move on to how you can buy, store, and invest ether.

4a - How do I buy ether?

If you are looking to buy ether using the money in your bank account, the best and easiest option is to use a brokerage.

An ether brokerage is essentially an online bureau de change for ether. Brokerage platforms sell ether at a fixed price, depending on the time and date of the transaction. Just like when exchanging pounds for euros at the airport, the price at which you can buy ether from a brokerage will be set by the current exchange rate, plus whatever commission the broker charges for exchanging your money.

Because of their commission rates, brokerages are the most straightforward way to purchase ether but not necessarily the cheapest. To find the best price, trading ether on an exchange is your best option. This will be explained in section 4c, but first you’ll need to know how to store any ether that you buy.

4b - How do I store my ether in a wallet?

In order to store ether, you’ll need a ether wallet. In section 3a we learned what ether wallets are, how they work, and their importance in the movement of ether, so now let’s run through the different types of wallet that you can get.

There are 5 different types of wallets: online wallets, desktop wallets, mobile wallets, paper wallets, and hardware wallets. Each wallet type functions as an account to store your ether, and enables you both to send ether to, and receive it from, other wallets. The difference between the different types of wallet is in the way they secure your private keys (essentially your password that allows you to transfer ether out of your wallet).

There are pros and cons to each wallet type, which you can learn about in our ‘Wallets’ section. If you’re getting your first ether wallet, then it’s easiest to get an online wallet, for which you’ll simply need to register with an email address and create a password. These wallets are commonly attached to exchanges (see 4c) or brokerages (see 4a) through which you can also buy ether.

Once you have a wallet, you’re ready to buy or trade ether on an exchange. Also, if you want to trade ether without needing a wallet then that’s also possible with CFD platforms. Keep reading and we’ll explain your ether trading options.

4c - How do I trade ether?

If you want to trade ether, then your two main options are exchanges and CFD platforms. These platforms are more complicated than brokerages, but provide more options for making profit out of ether. The only difference between the two is that exchanges require you to own and store the ether you’re trading in a wallet, whereas CFDs do this for you.

Trading ether with the above platforms is similar to regular day-trading. Users can try to profit through making trades around the price fluctuations of ether, just like with any other store of value like gold or regular fiat currency (pounds, euros, dollars).

On exchanges you’ll be trading your ether directly for other cryptocurrencies, and on CFD platforms you’re basically making bets with the trading platform about whether the price of ether will rise or fall. For this reason, you will need a wallet to use an exchange, but not to trade on a CFD platform.

As mentioned, these platforms are more complicated to use than brokerages, so it’s recommended to read our pages detailing how CFD platforms and exchanges work, which will guide you through the process and help you start trading for profit - if that’s how you want to use ether.

By now you’re probably wondering if ether has any uses other than trading for profit. The answer is a definite yes, and so the final stage of our ether tour will take you through the different ways you can use ether.

5a - What is ether used for?

Ether has two main usage purposes: to use as ‘gas’ to fuel smart contracts, and for ordinary everyday use like a ‘regular’ currency.

‘Gas’ is simply a unit of ether that is necessary for the successful operation of a smart contract on the Ethereum blockchain. Just like a car needs fuel to run on the road, smart contracts need ‘gas’ to operate on the Ethereum blockchain.

However, ether is now mostly used for its latter purpose. To give examples, many Australians today pay their household bills using ether, you can gamble with ether in many online casinos and betting sites, buy furniture from Overstock, and send remittance payments using your ether. Ether is particularly suited to the latter of these because it can be transferred anywhere in the world instantly with no conversion fees.

If you’re interested in learning more about ether gambling, our ‘Gambling’ pages will take you through everything you need to know. What we’re going to do next is run you through how you can spend your ether in real shops, both online and offline.

5b - Who accepts ether?

If you want to spend your ether, this is the most important question. Transactions with ether can only be completed with shops/individuals that accept it as a payment option and have a wallet address to receive ether. If this is the case, spending your ether usually involves the simple process of scanning a QR code generated by the shop’s wallet and inputting the amount of ether you wish to send.

If a shop or online platform accepts ether, it will be listed in their payment options. We’ll always keep you updated with new places that allow you to shop with your ether.

5c - What about shops that don’t accept ether?

It’s reasonable to think that if a shop doesn’t accept ether, then you can’t pay with it. While it may seem like this would make spending your ether impossible, this is actually not the case.

Companies have created products to encourage the adoption of ether into existing payment schemes around the world, rather than just waiting for every shop to accept ether directly. Ether debit cards allow you to pay with your ether anywhere that accepts ‘regular’ card payments.

Ether debit cards are loaded with ether, but allow you to pay in shops that only accept card payments. This means that it’s possible to incorporate ether into your day-to-day life easily, and you can even start paying for monthly expenses such as a mobile phone contract from your ether debit card.

6a - Where can I go to learn more?

Congratulations! You have completed our crash-course on Ethereum. Further information on everything we have discussed here can be found across CryptoSupermarket. If you have any questions to which you can't find an answer, then we’re always available via live chat to handle any queries.

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Is Ethereum a good investment?


Why it is

  • Ethereum is more than just a cryptocurrency, it's a decentralised network
  • It has big plans for expansion
  • Ethereum is likely to be a stable investment in the long-term
  • Buying with ether allows for anonymous, highly secure spending
  • Lots of people are just starting to use Ethereum

Why it isn't

  • Its price can fluctuate considerably
  • Ethereum exists in a crowded marketplace
  • Ether's value against conventional currency is not guaranteed
  • Ether can only be used in a select number of real shops

The best sites to buy, trade & store ether.


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